UMaine Alumnus Creates Fund for Maine 4-H Poultry Projects

L to r: Professor Emeritus of Animal, Veterinary and Aquatic Sciences Robert O. Hawes, Frankie Bozzino from Winterport, holding a Cochin Bantam that Bob had given him as a chick and Alice McKinstry Hawes

Dr. Robert O. Hawes and his wife, Alice, recently created an endowed fund at the University of Maine Foundation to support poultry projects in Maine 4-H clubs with a preference for projects involving heritage breeds. Dr. Hawes and Alice Hawes have been longtime supporters of poultry projects, Cooperative Extension, the Page Farm and Home Museum and 4-H Clubs in Maine.

The Hawes’ poultry fund will support projects that provide learning experiences in areas such as business, entrepreneurship, record keeping, documentation, problem-solving, food safety, and animal husbandry for Maine youth.

With Carolyn Christman of the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy, Dr. Hawes co-authored “Birds of a Feather: Saving Rare Turkeys from Extinction.” As a result of his commitment to turkey conservation, he received, in 2003, the Bixby-Sponenburg Breed Conservation Award from the ALBC. In 2014, he was recognized by the American Poultry Association for his long-term commitment to the breeding and exhibiting of pure-bred poultry.

Dr. Hawes has degrees from the University of Maine, the University of Massachusetts, and the Pennsylvania State University and is now Professor Emeritus of Animal, Veterinary and Aquatic Sciences at the University of Maine.

 

Humanities Center named for generous donors

Photo of Clem McGillicuddy

The University of Maine Humanities Center has a new name, reflecting the generous support of Clement McGillicuddy ’64 and his wife Linda of Hobe Sound, Florida and Northeast Harbor, Maine.

The McGillicuddys support the Humanities Center through a fund they established at the University of Maine Foundation. The two met in New York City while working in the computer industry, and are committed to “giving back” to a state that means a great deal to their family.

Clement McGillicuddy appreciates the Humanities Center’s diverse activities in Orono and across the state. He is especially appreciative that the Center’s outreach extends well beyond classroom learning and opens new horizons for high school students and other Maine citizens. He cites poetry as a long-time, personal interest that is celebrated by the Center, and lauds the Center’s director, Jennifer Moxley, as “a splendid poet and inspirational speaker”.

The UMaine alumnus adds that the Center’s mission resonates with his own experience as an undergraduate who grew up in Houlton, Maine. “The University of Maine exposed me to many new situations, including an introductory course that required us to pick up and read The New York Times every day. To this day, The New York Times feeds my deep interest in the human condition and how the world works.   Many of my courses at UMaine, unrelated to my major, contributed to my curiosity and created a foundation for lifelong learning.”

“An important role of the University of Maine is to advance — and advocate for — the humanities,” says UMaine President Susan J. Hunter. “Humanities teaching, research and engagement are critical to fulfilling our statewide mission. In collaboration with private and community partners, we help ensure that culture enriches the human experience.”

“The McGillicuddys are champions of the arts and humanities,” says Jeffrey Hecker, UMaine vice president for academic affairs and provost. “Their support for the Humanities Center will impact students and faculty, but also countless people of all ages who benefit from the partnerships the center has built with humanities organizations throughout the state. Their commitment to the arts and humanities, especially here in Maine, is inspiring.”

The Clement and Linda McGillicuddy Humanities Center advances teaching, research and public knowledge of the humanities. By developing and supporting programs that engage art, literature, history, philosophy, politics and diverse cultures, the MHC aims to enrich the lives of all Maine citizens.

 

Photo above: Clement McGillicuddy ’64

Read more about the Clement and Linda McGillicuddy Humanities Center 

 

 

Sarah Holbrook, The Making of a Neuroscientist

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Sarah Holbrook moved to Fort Fairfield, Maine as a young girl with her mother and siblings, and immediately began to feel welcomed and supported in their new community. Soon, volunteerism and community connections served to bolster her place as a valuable and influential member of the town. Sarah credits much of her support to the people of Fort Fairfield, whom she served in outlets such as the local soup kitchen. “Someone else who also volunteered for the food pantry bought me my first graphing calculator for a calculus class, and I still have that with me,” Sarah said, sitting in her lab in Little Hall, working over spring break.

“I’d just love to thank everyone for helping me out so much. I hope to continue making you proud in grad school and in my further studies. I will give back in any way I can.”

— Sarah Holbrook, Class of 2017

As a first-generation college student, Sarah gained most of her knowledge and context for college readiness from the Upward Bound program at the University of Maine at Presque Isle. “Upward Bound [at UMPI] really prepared me a lot for college — meeting motivated, like-minded individuals and preparing for college life,” said Sarah. The Fort Fairfield Class of 2013 consisted of 30 graduates, and the 300-person, BIO 100 class during Sarah’s freshman year proved to be a bit of a shock. Now, Sarah says the friendships she made here will continue throughout the rest of her academic career and lifetime.

Along with the support she received from programs like Upward Bound, Sarah credits scholarship support from Foundation-held scholarships as a key factor in her success at the University of Maine. Since her freshman year, Sarah’s scholarship support has come from funds that help students like her flourish in their programs at the university.

Sarah was awarded the Smith & Charlene McIntire Scholarship, and the Edward and Lea Anne Cote Scholarship. The majority of the recipients of these scholarship funds are natives of the County, as per the wishes of the donors, allowing them to give back to one of their own. Sarah has been studying the effects of ethanol alcohol on the brains of mice. Her research focuses on the way mice respond to withdrawal symptoms when alcohol is introduced, and subsequently taken away. The ways that alcohol affects circadian rhythms and anxiety symptoms are also facets of her findings.

Now, as she approaches graduation, Sarah is looking forward to further education. “I was just accepted into the biology master’s program here [at UMaine],” said Sarah. Sarah has accepted her spot in the UMaine Master’s program, and she will continue to study neuroscience. “We could go on studying the brain for centuries and still not know exactly how everything works. It’s such a mystery,” Sarah said, “Really, I just love learning, and the more we can learn about how we think about what we think, and understand how we understand through neuroscience, that will benefit everyone.” Sarah’s experiences have been influential on her little sister, a UMaine first-year student who is taking advantage of the path that her sibling has forged.

Emera Maine Honors UMaine Professor Dick Hill through Scholarship Fund

Emera Maine Prof. Richard C. Hill Scholarhip check

L-R: Dana N. Humphrey, P.E., Ph.D., College of Engineering, Dean, Jeffery N. Mills, Ph.D., University of Maine Foundation, President/CEO, Alan Richardson, Emera Maine, President/COO, Susan J. Hunter, Ph.D., University of Maine, President

As part of the Maine Day of Giving on May 3, 2017, Emera Maine, in collaboration with the University of Maine Foundation, announced its creation of the Emera Maine Professor Richard C. Hill Scholarship Fund. Alan Richardson, President and COO, Emera Maine, spoke fondly of his memories in meeting and working with Dick Hill, and of the impact he hopes Emera’s gift will positively impart on the University of Maine. “Professor Hill’s dedication and leadership were integral to the fabric of the energy community in Maine,” said Richardson, “He made a lasting impression on many throughout the industry. We are honored to continue to support and inspire those curious engineering minds that are yet to follow.”

Prof. Richard C. Hill was a member of the engineering community at the University of Maine from 1946 until his retirement in 1992. During his distinguished career, Dick served as Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Dean of the College of Technology, and Director of the Department of Industrial Cooperation.

“Prof. Dick Hill influenced generations of UMaine Engineers, and helped broadly inform Maine citizens on energy issues,” said Dr. Jeff Mills, President, University of Maine Foundation, “We couldn’t be more pleased that Alan Richardson wished to establish the Emera Maine Prof. Dick Hill Scholarship at the University of Maine Foundation, to encourage students to apply their talent to power our state and country.”

Emera Maine has pledged $110,000 to provide two scholarships annually and endow them in perpetuity. The awards will be made to engineering students who exhibit the innovative spirit and natural leadership qualities embodied by Professor Hill. In the spirit of the Maine Day of Giving, additional gifts in Dick’s honor may be made online, our.umaine.edu/hill.

BECUM spring 2017 recap

Dr. Dana Humphrey & Chris Gordon

In spring 2017, the Boston Executive Club of the University of Maine celebrated 10 years of bringing University of Maine alumni together to network in a professional setting, highlighting UMaine’s signature academic and research programs, and engaging volunteer support for the College of our Hearts Always.

Chris Gordon ’85 and Dean Dana Humphrey presented “Future Skylines.”  Chris shared his role, as President of Wynn Design and Development Massachusetts, in the construction of the $2.1B Wynn Boston Harbor resort casino on the Mystic River in Everett. Dean Dana Humphrey addressed the growing demand for UMaine engineers by industry and need for a new academic Engineering Education and Design Center building on campus to accommodate the 2,000 engineering students now enrolled at UMaine, and continued growth.

Over 80 alumni and friends from the greater Boston area attended the event.  Guests were greeted by friendly faces and lovely weather at the UMaine Club at the UMass Club in Boston at its new location at One Beacon Street. UMaine Foundation President Jeff Mills ’82 and John Diamond ’77, ’89G, President, UMaine Alumni Association both spoke about current events at the University of Maine.

As a special part of the 10-year anniversary celebration, attendees also enjoyed a slideshow of previous BECUM photos.

 

View Dr. Dana’s presentation here.


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If you are interested in attending a future BECUM event, please contact the University of Maine Foundation, or keep an eye on our BECUM webpage.

 

 

 

 

New Scholarship Celebrates the Power of Stories

Kristin Langellier and Eric Peterson photo

Professors Emeriti Kristin M. Langellier and Eric E. Peterson share many stories through the unique intersection of their personal and professional lives. Married since 1979, both taught communication courses at the University of Maine from 1980 until their retirement in 2016. Langellier’s scholarship and teaching encompassed performance studies and narrative communication; Peterson focused on media consumption, critical and cultural communication studies, and qualitative research methods.

Interdisciplinary awareness marks both careers. Langellier’s career includes contributions to Women’s and Gender Studies, Franco American Studies, and the interdisciplinary, community-based collaborative Somali Narrative Project. Peterson’s scholarship draws upon traditions in the human sciences to examine communication phenomena that range from popular culture and identity politics to pedagogy and classroom communication.

Both Peterson and Langellier have strong memories of their early days at UMaine. Kristin notes, “We had very good support from our department. I have a distinct memory of being mentored.” She is quick to recognize the late Dwayne VanRheenen, who served as department chair during their formative years in Orono. Describing their mentor’s emphasis on community rather than individualism within academe they both note, “Dwayne always came from the ‘we’ rather than the ‘I’ and emphasized what each of us could contribute to our department.”

Given the breadth of their interests, it is no surprise that both share a deep interest in storytelling, as demonstrated in the book they co-authored in 2004, “Storytelling in Daily Life.” Langellier is quick to point out that stories have long had an important role in her life, dating back to her childhood as one of ten siblings. “To listen to a story is a gift; to tell a story is a gift,” Langellier said. “It makes people present to each other.”

In their retirement, the couple enjoys traveling to Brunswick every Friday to spend time with their grandson, Jack. Not surprisingly, they are working on an album of photographs and stories for him.

Philanthropy is another common theme in their lives. Peterson and Langellier have supported Women’s Basketball, the Honors College, the Schonberger Peace and Social Justice Lecture, and the Orono Bog Boardwalk. Peterson explains, “The university has been our center and our community. Most of the funds we support are an extension of our teaching and research.” Women’s basketball, he notes, is naturally of interest to two Midwesterners.

As is often the case, colleagues, friends, and former students have also contributed to the Kristin M. Langellier and Eric E. Peterson Scholarship Fund that will benefit junior and senior Communication majors with a GPA of at least 3.0 and demonstrated financial need. One of the donors is Zornitsa Dimova Keremidchieva ’99G, ’01G, who has two master’s degrees from the University of Maine: one in English with a concentration in Composition, Rhetoric, and Pedagogy and a second one in Communication Studies. Originally from Bulgaria, Keremidchieva describes Peterson and Langellier as “among the most careful and thoughtful scholars I have ever worked with,” who taught her an “ethos of caring” while providing her with a map of the field and a compass that continue to serve her every day. Keremidchieva will soon begin a tenure-track position at the University of Minnesota, where she looks forward to “paying it forward” by mentoring her own students. Wistful about her formative experience at UMaine, she is quick to add, “I will never be able to give back enough. My debt (to faculty members like Langellier and Peterson) is bigger than can ever be repaid.”

Photo: Kristin M. Langellier and Eric E. Peterson c. 1991

 

Make a gift to the Kristin M. Langellier and Eric E. Peterson Scholarship Fund